Our Legal Heritage

46-52 of 52 Articles
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In 1748, James Douglas, 14th Earl of Morton, an antiquarian who had travelled in Egypt, presented a mummy to the Faculty.

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In the latest of our occasional series, Graham Ogilvy discovers a curious legal relic in Dunkeld. What would the Howard League make of it? The strange door into the foundations of Telford's famous bridge across the Tay in Dunkeld is painted an innocuous blue but the heavy iron locks l

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In the latest in our occasional legal heritage series, Graham Ogilvy reflects on the remarkable story of ‘Indian’ Peter Williamson. A document presently on display in the library of the Faculty of Advocates records one of the most shocking episodes of human trafficking in Scottish histor

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In the third of our occasional series looking at Scotland's legal heritage, both grand and obscure, Graham Ogilvy appreciates Sir John Steell's statue of George Kinloch in Dundee. George Kinloch is not the only outlaw in Scotland to be publicly commemorated. Stirling's Wallace Memorial, the obelisk

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In the second of our new occasional series, Connor Beaton looks at John Maclean's famous speech from the dock. A hundred years ago this week, Scottish socialist John Maclean delivered a famous polemic against capitalism and war from the dock of the High Court in Edinburgh.

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In the first of our new occasional series, we look at the Infamous case of the Appin murder. In 1752 Colin Campbell of Glenure, known as the Red Fox, was shot dead in woods near Ballachulish in Argyll. His death led to what is widely regarded as one of Scotland’s most notorious miscarriag

46-52 of 52 Articles