Articles



Teacher’s damages claim for ‘psychiatric injury’ after being ‘excluded’ from school dismissed

A teacher who was “excluded” from a school after raising a personal injury action against a Scottish local authority following a fall at work, and then sought damages for a “depressive illness” he sustained as a result, has had his claim for “psychiatric injury” dismissed.

Published 22 July 2019

Shepherd and Wedderburn opens office in Ireland

Shepherd and Wedderburn has opened an office in Ireland to ensure continuity of service to clients across the EU post-Brexit.

Published 22 July 2019

Morton Fraser records 12 per cent decline in profit

Morton Fraser has recorded like-for-like revenue growth of £22 million while profit has declined by 12 per cent to less than £12m.

Published 22 July 2019

William Andrews CBE

The Scotsman has published an obituary of William Denys Cathcart Andrews CBE, WS, solicitor and past president of the Law Society of Scotland, who passed away on 1 July 2019 at the age of 88.

Published 22 July 2019

Opt-out organ donation comes into force in Autumn 2020

Legislation to introduce an opt-out system of organ and tissue donation for deceased donors will come into force in Autumn 2020.

Published 22 July 2019

New legislation to crack down on misuse of non-disclosure agreements

New legislation aims to tackle the misuse of non-disclosure agreements (NDAs), also known as confidentiality clauses, in the workplace – including those being used to cover up sexual harassment, racial discrimination and assault.

Published 22 July 2019

Community land buying powers not “fit for purpose”

Community land buying powers have not been used since they were brought in a year ago, prompting claims the law is not “fit for purpose”.

Published 22 July 2019

Key Westminster committee calls for 10-year 'qualified statute of limitations' for alleged offences by soldiers

A key Westminster committee has called for a 10-year "qualified statute of limitations" to protect former and serving soldiers from investigation and prosecution for alleged offences, including alleged murders of civilians in Northern Ireland.

Published 22 July 2019

Karen Harvie joins Aberdein Considine's employment law team in Edinburgh

Aberdein Considine has appointed Karen Harvie to the position of senior associate following a significant period of growth.

Published 22 July 2019

Jennifer Liddell: Civil partnerships to become open to all

The law on civil partnerships, north and south of the border, is set to change, writes Jennifer Liddell.

Published 22 July 2019

International Conference of Legal Regulators coming to Scotland

Legal regulators from around the world will be coming to Edinburgh in September to debate a wide range of regulatory topics with global relevance.

Published 22 July 2019

England: Third of police files returned by prosecutors due to significant mistakes

A third of police files prepared for prosecutors in England and Wales are being returned because of significant mistakes, often leading to delays in the court process, new figures reveal.

Published 22 July 2019

And finally... offa stupid

A farmer has been fined more than £2,000 for damage to an ancient earthwork which he tried and failed to blame on his sheep.

Published 22 July 2019

Rapist who claimed rubbing woman’s leg could not corroborate rape of another woman loses appeal against conviction

A man found guilty of rape and sexual assault who claimed that the two offences were too dissimilar for the doctrine of “mutual corroboration” to apply has had an appeal against his conviction rejected.

Published 19 July 2019

UK government torture inquiry refusal a ‘broken promise’ to torture survivors

The UK government has refused to hold an inquiry into British involvement in rendition and torture, while presenting updated Whitehall guidance – the so-called ‘torture policy’ – that fails to expressly prohibit ministers authorising action carrying a real risk of torture, human rights organisation Reprieve said.

Published 19 July 2019