Letter to the editor



In the wake of yesterday’s article on child tax credit legislation we are pleased to publish the following reader’s letter. As is the case with yesterday’s article we do not necessarily agree with its contents.

Sirs,

I was shocked but not surprised to see the anonymous article published in today’s edition on the ‘so-called rape clause’. Please could you advise why you felt it was appropriate to provide a forum for an article which has as its fundamental premise ‘women will lie about rape to gain an additional £13.70 per week.’? The author of the article is entitled to his view (I am making the assumption that it was a male writer) but I can see no reason why Scottish Legal News chose to publish it, what’s next an article about why individuals from certain ethnicities are more likely to commit crimes?

Leaving aside the abhorrent misogynist premise of the ‘article’ it is otherwise a political rant about the need for benefit cuts and attacking politicians (in particular Nicola Sturgeon) who spoke out against the policy along with numerous third sector organisations. I fail to see the relevance of presenting these political arguments in a legal newsletter.

This newsletter frequently gives a platform to writers who demonstrate anti-women sentiments, in particular I recall the article a few years ago that trivialised domestic abuse along the lines of ‘it’s only a domestic’. I recall an article from another ‘anonymous solicitor in private practice’ on false allegations of domestic abuse, irresponsibly promoting and propagating the myth that women commonly lie about these type of offences.

There was the opinion piece yesterday (authored at least) about the David Goodwillie case, taking aim at the ‘growing victim industry’ and pouring scorn on the concept of not ’doubly traumatising’ people.I also note the regular platform given to Families need Fathers Scotland to present their male-centric view of family court actions without reply.

Taken together these articles give an uncomfortable impression of the editorial views of this newsletter – I hope this impression is mistaken.

Unlike your many of your contributors I’m happy to put my name to what I write.

Euan McDougall

Solicitor in private practice



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